Vice President Boakai, WHO Director General Hold Talks on Health Issues

Vice President Boakai, WHO Director General Hold Talks on Health Issues

Geneva, Switzerland - Vice President Joseph Boakai has been meeting with the head of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Dr. Margaret Chan and the two discuss a wide range of issues affecting the health sectors of developing nations.

Vice President Boakai paying a courtesy calls on Dr. Chan and her Staff.

In her welcome remarks Dr. Chan said ‘I am very proud of Liberia and recounted that Ebola is a natural occurrence and ecological evolution that no nation has control over.

She said countries such as Brazil, Angola and China have had their share of the epidemics and those countries that experience these outbreaks should not feel ashamed because these are natural happenings that no one can cause or stop.

Dr. Chan praised the Government and people of Liberia for their response to the Ebola crisis.

She noted that we live in a complex world full of uncertainties and those emergencies as Ebola requires team work, the political will and community action which the people of Liberia clearly demonstrated during the epidemic. She warned that such outbreaks know no borders and that no one country can stop an epidemic.

For his part, Vice President Boakai said, no one is safe in a world of uncertainties and that global action was required to handle emergencies such as the ebola epidemic that surfaced in theMano River basin.

He praised the WHO for the role that it played during the ebola crisis.

Dr. Chan spoke of the need for reforms in the health sectors of developing countries because according to her the population is changing so are the diseases adapting, changing and resisting new treatments, adding health care reform is an on- going journey.

She warned that if resources for the nation are placed in the hands of the wrong people it can be a problem for the rest of the population especially for the health sector.

The World Health Organization Boss pointed out that at least forty five percent of the national budget should be allocated to health and further warned that if the children today and not healthy, the economy tomorrow will also be sick, a dispatch from Geneva said.