Liberia's Rape Court Resident Circuit Judge Joe Fayiah Is Dead

Liberia's Rape Court Resident Circuit Judge Joe Fayiah Is Dead

Monrovia - The President of the National Trial Judges of Liberia says they are saddened by the death of one of its members, Judge Joseph Fayiah.


Report by Bettie K. Johnson-Mbayo/ This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Judge Fayiah, Resident Circuit Judge of Criminal Court “E” died at SOS Clinic in Congo Town during the early morning hours of Tuesday after a protracted illness.

Judge Fayiah was the longest serving member of the Judges Association, according to its President, Judge Roosevelt Willie.

In an interview with FPA, Judge Roosevelt said, “He was one of the illustrious judges and he was the longest serving member of the trial judges, so his death saddened the Association.”
Judged Roosevelt was said to have led an exemplary life which many judges admired and copied after. 

Judge Fayiah had years of working experience in various positions within Liberia’s judicial system since 1992 as Associate Magistrate and other positions, including Judicial Inquiry Commission member and training officer of the James A. A. Pierre Judicial Institute.

Serving as trainer at the Judicial Institute he called on magistrates and trainees to be professional in the charge of their duties to the Judiciary.

The fallen Judge was commissioned in 2005 as resident judge of the Rape Court (Criminal Court “E”) for Montserrado County along with Judge Yarmie Gbeisay.

He was nominated by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and subsequently confirmed by the Legislature.

Judge Fayiah would be remembered by journalists covering the court for his media friendliness.

At the ceremony marking his official taking over the Criminal Court “E”, Judge Fayiah assured journalists that he would ensure that nothing hindered the coverage of cases at the rape court.

He was tough on complaints of extortion in the Liberian court system, vowing to throw out courts staff demanding and extorting money from aggrieved parties as preconditions for the issuance and service of precepts [writs or warrants].